South Tees Institute of Learning, Research and Innovation (STRIVE)

South Tees Institute of Learning, Research and Innovation (STRIVE)

Posted on November 9

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The Renal Unit at James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, has taken an innovative approach in training healthcare undergraduates to identify and manage acute kidney injury (AKI).

The AKI simulation programme at South Tees Institute of Learning, Research and Innovation (STRIVE) provides a series of real-world scenarios for students to learn about and practice management of AKI before entering a busy clinical environment.

AKI commonly complicates acute illness meaning newly qualified doctors, nurses and pharmacists encounter AKI early in their careers. Furthermore. they are assigned roles fundamental to AKI recognition and care, including daily review of medications, fluid balance and blood results.

Dr Jonathan Murray, Renal Consultant for South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has worked closely with the Academic Health Science Network North East and North Cumbria for several years, to improve and standardise good quality AKI care across the region and to identify unmet needs.

“Building upon previous patient safety collaborative work with the Academic Health Science Network for the North East and North Cumbria aiming to improve and standardise AKI detection and care, we developed and evaluated an innovative AKI SBL programme which has enabled our students to gain understanding and pragmatic confidence, so that they feel better prepared to identify and manage AKI.” – Dr Jonathan Murray

Dr Murray said: “We recognised strategies to promote safe and quality AKI care should thus include medical, nursing and pharmacist students, so they are well prepared to deliver effective AKI care soon after qualification. Traditional lecture-based undergraduate teaching conventionally focuses upon “complex” renal diseases, with less emphasis on practical AKI care.

“Simulation-based learning (SBL) promotes critical thinking, communication and decision-making skills, all fundamental to AKI care and enables students to experience clinical responsibility and identify learning opportunities in a safe environment.

“Building upon previous patient safety collaborative work with the Academic Health Science Network for the North East and North Cumbria aiming to improve and standardise AKI detection and care, we developed and evaluated an innovative AKI SBL programme which has enabled our students to gain understanding and pragmatic confidence, so that they feel better prepared to identify and manage AKI.

“We used the excellent SIM facilities at South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in order to deliver this training in a COVID compliant simulated clinical environment, during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Watch the AKI Sim video for further details